New York Times Columnist Line of the Day

If you frequent this here premier “web log,” there’s a good chance you may once or twice have read the New York Times op-ed page. You might even recognize the names of the columnists, who every day spout the most conventionally wise of the conventional wisdom. This is a feature that is dedicated to these folks, highlighting one line that is either funny, ridiculous, strange, or actually intelligent or well-written.

Today’s is a quick one from our buddy Thomas Friedman, whose column today, “Smart Approaches, Not Strong-Arm Tactics, to Jobs,” contains the line:

Pass the vodka.

We hear ya.

New York Times Columnist Line of the Day

If you frequent this here premier “web log,” there’s a good chance you may once or twice have read the New York Times op-ed page. You might even recognize the names of the columnists, who every day spout the most conventionally wise of the conventional wisdom. This is a feature that is dedicated to these folks, highlighting one line that is either funny, ridiculous, strange, or actually intelligent or well-written.

Yeah, it’s been a while since last we discussed the vagaries of the New York Times op-ed page, but this is a good one for our return. You see, David Brooks, man we’ve long mocked in these pages, produced some pure greatness today. While I tend to be averse to the term “mansplain,” mostly because I don’t use portmanteaus that often, Mr. Brooks is full of it today. Let’s look into his column, titled “After the Women’s March.” Well, with that title, I can bet you already know where this is going:

If the anti-Trump forces are to have a chance, they have to offer a better nationalism, with diversity cohering around a central mission, building a nation that balances the dynamism of capitalism with biblical morality.

The march didn’t come close. Hint: The musical “Hamilton” is a lot closer.

Yes, David Brooks wants “anti-Trump forces” to combine the dynamism of capitalism with biblical morality.  Just like Jesus said. I’m just going to leave that Hamilton reference alone.