Watch: This day-by-day animation of World War I

With about the least amount of fanfare possible, yesterday was the 100th anniversary of the start of the Great War. It wasn’t just about the western front. Check out the above animation, which shows all the movements each day.

This is a war that may take a backseat in our history classes to the other big one, but all of geopolitics was formed by this conflict, especially the middle east (remember that the countries all in conflict right now are because of the fake lines drawn on a map after the Ottoman Empire was destroyed in this very same war).

Legend:

Maroon = Central Powers and annexed lands.
Burgundy = Areas militarily occupied by the Central Powers.
Red = Central Power puppet or client states.
Brown = Central Powers in an armistice.
Pink = Central Power gains for that day.
Dark blue = Allied powers
Blue = Central Powered lands militarily occupied by the Allies.
Blue-grey = Allied powers in an armisitce.
Light blue = Allied gains for that day.

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New York Times Columnist Line of the Day

If you frequent this here premier “web log,” there’s a good chance you may once or twice have read the New York Times op-ed page. You might even recognize the names of the columnists, who every day spout the most conventionally wise of the conventional wisdom. This is a feature that is dedicated to these folks, highlighting one line that is either funny, ridiculous, strange, or actually intelligent or well-written.

Today’s is from Gail Collins, who in her column today, “None Dare Call it Impeachment,” writes:

I am mentioning this in part because it’s always fun to write “Ted Yoho.”

I am mentioning this in part because it’s always fun to write “I can’t believe you have a job writing this.”

Morning Constitutional – Thursday, 31 July 2014

Good morning, everybody. Alicia Keys is pregnant. Now, your morning constitutional:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vowed Thursday to destroy Hamas’s sophisticated tunnel network in Gaza and would not accept any cease-fire agreement that does not allow the Israeli military to do so. Israel has called up an additional 16,000 reservists.

Rival militias in Tripoli, Libya, agreed to a temporary cease-fire Wednesday, as at least 75 bodies of mostly soldiers were found in Benghazi. The fighting throughout Libya has caused Western powers to at least temporarily abandon efforts to bolster Libya’s nascent democratic institutions,

For the first time, international investigators were finally able to reach the site of the downed Malaysian Airlines flight 17 in rebel-held eastern Ukraine.

Argentina defaulted on its debt obligations.

Poll shows that Marine Le Pen, leader of France’s far-right National Front party, would knock out the Socialist Party contenders, both the current president Hollande and more popular prime minister Valls, in the presidential race if the election were held now.

Unaccompanied immigrant children who are apprehended at the border are being put first in line to go before immigration judges.

Sierra Leone has declared an Ebola emergency.

Fewer people signed up for unemployment benefits in the past month than any month in the past eight years. Here are some charts illustrating how the economy seems to be finally perking up.

President Obama in Kansas Wednesday called on Republicans to ‘stop just hatin’ all the time,” Meanwhile. Republicans in the House voted to sue the president. Why.

The middle class is 20 percent poorer than it was is 1984.

There’s no debate: Economists widely believe the stimulus helped the economy.

Why we don’t know the size of the transgender population.

Finally, nonviolence rally marred by multiple fights.

New York Times Columnist Line of the Day

If you frequent this here premier “web log,” there’s a good chance you may once or twice have read the New York Times op-ed page. You might even recognize the names of the columnists, who every day spout the most conventionally wise of the conventional wisdom. This is a feature that is dedicated to these folks, highlighting one line that is either funny, ridiculous, strange, or actually intelligent or well-written.

Today’s is from Thomas Friedman, who in his column today, “Maybe in America,” he writes:

More important, the combined pressures of the market (globalization and the speed with which investment can flow into countries doing the right things and out of those doing bad things), Moore’s Law (the steady rise in computing power that makes every good job today require more education) and Mother Nature (climate change, biodiversity loss, erosion and population growth) have all passed certain tipping points.

For those of you keeping track at home, I think we hit the most Thomas Friedman Trifecta ever.

Morning Constitutional – Wednesday, 30 July 2014

Good morning, folks. Scarlett Johansson got a haircut. Now, your morning constitutional:

Israel killed at least 19 Palestinians sheltering in a school in Gaza on Wednesday. Israeli public support for the war in Gaza and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is widespread and growing, and a poll suggests that 87 percent of Israelis support continuing the conflict.

As the U.S. and Europe impose new sanctions against Russia, Russians are increasingly worrying that President Vladimir Putin’s actions will hurt ties with the international community and the Russian economy. Ukraine says that it has seized the town of Avdiivka near the rebel stronghold of Donetsk.

Militants in Somalia killed a woman for not wearing a veil.

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that a new Mississippi law that would shudder the state’s last abortion clinic is unconstitutional.

The U.S. economy beat expectations and grew by an annualized 4% in the second quarter. Also, ADP says the private sector added 218,000 jobs in July.

The National Labor Relations Bureau ruled yesterday that McDonald’s is a co-employer of franchise employees, which could make the company liable for complaints of unfair labor practices such as wage theft.

A New York Times investigation shows that European governments have paid at least $125 million to al-Qaeda in ransoms.

Almost every criminal case reviewed by the FBI and Department of Justice as part of an investigation into the FBI forensic lab included flawed forensic testimony.

The typical household in the U.S. lost a third of their wealth in the past ten years (but the decline started way before that). Rich people got a lot richer, though.

Today in false equivalence: AP article about Senate activity halting blames both parties equally, but fails to find an instance of Democrats holding up activity.

Instead of quickly passing a House bill to find the Highway Trust Fund until next spring as expected, the Senate passed its own version that would expire in December and sent it to the House.

McDonald’s in Japan rolls out tofu nuggets.

Things to know about food stamps, that program that Republicans want to demolish.

Did you know that Uber drivers also rate their passengers?

Finally, woman calls cops to complain about the purity of her meth.

New York Times Columnist Line of the Day

If you frequent this here premier “web log,” there’s a good chance you may once or twice have read the New York Times op-ed page. You might even recognize the names of the columnists, who every day spout the most conventionally wise of the conventional wisdom. This is a feature that is dedicated to these folks, highlighting one line that is either funny, ridiculous, strange, or actually intelligent or well-written.

Today’s is the opening line from David Brooks’s column today, “No War is an Island,” in which he writes:

It’s amazing how much of the discussion of the Gaza war is based on the supposition that it is still 1979.

I think Brooks has just been accidentally ready newspapers from 1979 again.